Gemini Rights by Steve Lacy album review by Robert Duguay. The multi-artist's full length is now available via RCA/L-M Records and DSPs

RCA Records/L-M

8.5

Steve Lacy

Gemini Rights

I’ll be honest, I have no familiarity with the Los Angeles alt-R&B act The Internet so by default I have no prior interaction with their guitarist Steve Lacy’s solo material.

While this might be awfully “noob” of me to review Lacy’s latest album Gemini Rights that came out on July 15 via L-M and RCA Records, I think the absolute objectiveness of a stranger can be appreciated. At first listen, I get a ‘70s vibe from the record in a cohesive way. There’s a groove that’s established along with astounding harmonies. The beats and arrangements are tight with the percussion having a stellar presence.

One thing that’s unique about this record is how it’s being promoted to the fashion community. Lacy was recently at both Paris Fashion Week and Morocco for a fashion runway exhibit promoting his album, which gives off some Lenny Kravitz vibes. While the music may be a bit different, Kravitz did the same thing with his music during the 2000s and it’s paid dividends ever since. Musically, there’s a motif to what Lacy is creating within his latest release. It’s all over the place while also knowing it’s boundaries, but overall it exudes an honest coolness rather than being obnoxiously pretentious.

“Mercury” reminds me of Al Green for some reason with the string instruments and harmonies. This track is why I get the ‘70s vibe of the record while this track gives off a low key soul vibe as well. There’s a certain psychedelia starting off “Buttons” and then the beat comes in to lay the foundation. A rapidness in rhythm comes in during “Sunshine” while Fousheé’s vocals counteracts Lacy’s rapping. Other songs worth checking out are “Helmet”, “Bad Habit” and “Give You The World”.

There’s a retro aesthetic within Gemini Rights and that makes for a pretty cool listening experience. I get this vibe through the instrumentation of the music which makes sense due to Lacy being a guitarist. It seems like he has a legit band behind him during the recordings rather than him rapping, singing and vocalizing over pre-recorded tracks. It’s a modern spin on R&B’s ‘70s golden age and it deserves to be appreciated. This is exactly why you should give it a listen.

Purchase Gemini Rights by Steve Lacy HERE