Zella Day Collaborates With Weyes Blood

Zella Day and Weyes Blood collaborate on "Holocene"
Zella Day and Weyes Blood "Holocene"

Singer-songwriter, Zella Day, has dropped “Holocene,” the track, a message of hope and unity and a call for reflection. “Holocene” is a collaboration with Natalie Mering of Weyes Blood. The sonic exploration by the duo has been in the works since the public display of their undeniable vocal chemistry following an invitation from Lana Del Rey for the pair to join her onstage during her Norman Fucking Rockwell Tour at the Hollywood Bowl.

Holocene features lush harmonies layered over syncopated beats and gently strummed guitars. Mering contributed vocals, keyboards, and co-production on the track, which was written by Day, Mering, and Mia Kerr. The production of Holocene was led and recorded by Gus Seyffert (Beck, Michael Kiwanuka, Bedouine, Dr. Dog, Jenny Lewis).

“Zella and I already had a sisterhood thing going on, and it made sense to get a song together that captured the uneasiness of these times, the acceleration of uncertainty,” notes Mering.

“These days it seems music is the only superpower I can count on to protect me from the threats that lurk within the complete unknown. If hope were a paper airplane and shot into the sky I grabbed it with my hands as it was floating by and unfolded the paper to absorb the contents inside. ‘Crazy Train’ was scribbled at the top of the page and when I looked to see what the words were that were bleeding through from the other side of the paper Holocene was there waiting to be sung. There was laughter in the room when the songs were made, tears being shed on the other sides of the walls, but I’m not going to sit here and pretend that I didn’t cry in the studio too. We’ve all needed a refuge this year, this is a glimpse into mine,” says Day.

“Over the last year I have found myself living in two conflicted mental states: days where I’m impassioned, so many words and thoughts surrounding our current climate extending throughout my being. The other reality is emptiness, a complete loss for words. Exhaustion. Loneliness. Sometimes loneliness becomes a giant casting a long shadow that I can’t outrun. I learned not to be too hard on myself in these moments, ultimately trusting that the motivation to create would eventually come back to me. “Holocene” was the rain that fell. It’s a collection of thoughts, a song for the interpersonal relationship between the world inside and outside of ourselves.”