Morrissey drops single “Morning Starship”

Morrissey has releases the second single off his upcoming album of 60s/70s covers, California Son : Jobriath's "Morning Starship."
Morrissey "Morning Starship."

Morrissey has releases the second single off his upcoming album of 60s/70s covers, California Son : Jobriath’s “Morning Starship.” The track, which features Ed Droste of Grizzly Bear, sees Morrissey showcasing his immediately-recognizable baritone over a jangling cacophony of guitar and harpsichord, staying loyal to the original while breaking new ground.

The Britpop icon recently announced his debut Broadway run at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater, where he’s set to perform a career retrospective spanning his storied career from his early days to ‘California Son’ (May 24th, BMG).

‘CALIFORNIA SON’ TRACK LISTING
1. Morning Starship (Jobriath) with Ed Droste of Grizzly Bear
2. Don’t Interrupt The Sorrow (Joni Mitchell) with Ariel Engle of Broken Social Scene
3. Only a Pawn In Their Game (Bob Dylan) with Petra Haden
4. Suffer the Little Children (Buffy St Marie)
5. Days of Decision (Phil Ochs) with Sameer Gadhia of Young The Giant
6. It’s Over (Roy Orbison) with LP
7. Wedding Bell Blues (The Fifth Dimension) with Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day & Lydia Night of The Regrettes
8. Loneliness Remembers What Happiness Forgets (Dionne Warwick)
9. Lady Willpower (Gary Puckett)
10. When You Close Your Eyes (Carly Simon) with Petra Haden
11. Lenny’s Tune (Tim Hardin)
12. Some Say I Got Devil (Melanie)

“‘California Son’ traverses the sonic landscape of the 60s & 70s, covering untouchable luminaries like Joni Mitchell, Dionne Warwick, and Bob Dylan while also delving into more obscure musicians of the time, such as early gay icon Jobriath and political activist Phil Ochs. Paying equal tribute to the marginalized stars as he does household names—and taking on these covers with modern alt-rock royalty guests including Billy Joe Armstrong (Green Day), Ed Droste (Grizzly Bear), Sameer Gadhia (Young the Giant), and LP — the record serves as a bridge between space, time, and rock music’s past, present, and future.”